Bratenahl, Ohio

Bratenahl, Ohio

Village

Gateway to a Lakeshore Boulevard estate

Location in Cuyahoga County and the state of Ohio.

Location of Ohio in the United States

Coordinates: 41°33′15″N 81°36′16″W / 41.55417°N 81.60444°W / 41.55417; -81.60444Coordinates: 41°33′15″N 81°36′16″W / 41.55417°N 81.60444°W / 41.55417; -81.60444

Country
United States

State
Ohio

County
Cuyahoga

Government

 • Type
mayor-council

 • Mayor
John Licastro

 • Council President
Paul Stephan

Area[1]

 • Total
1.60 sq mi (4.14 km2)

 • Land
1.02 sq mi (2.64 km2)

 • Water
0.58 sq mi (1.50 km2)

Elevation[2]
614 ft (187 m)

Population (2010)[3]

 • Total
1,197

 • Estimate (2012[4])
1,184

 • Density
1,173.5/sq mi (453.1/km2)

Time zone
Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)

 • Summer (DST)
EDT (UTC-4)

ZIP code
44108

Area code(s)
216

FIPS code
39-08336[5]

GNIS feature ID
1048543[2]

Bratenahl (/ˈbrætənɑːl/ BRAT-ən-ahl) is a village in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States. It is bordered by the city of Cleveland on three sides and by the shoreline of Lake Erie to the north. The population was 1,197 at the 2010 census.[6] Bratenahl is ranked as the 92nd highest-income place in the United States and 6th in the state of Ohio.

Contents

1 Profile
2 Geography
3 Demographics

3.1 2010 census
3.2 2000 census

4 Surrounding communities
5 References
6 External links

Profile[edit]
Incorporated in 1905, Bratenahl is one of the older residential suburbs of Cleveland along with Shaker Heights, Lakewood, and Cleveland Heights; of these, Bratenahl has the highest per capita wealth. Bratenahl is a small community of fewer than 1,200 population inhabiting approximately 700 households, some of which are stately estates, townhouses, and condominiums on the lakefront. A significant percentage (10%)[7] of municipal revenue comes from traffic tickets issued by the Bratenahl police on the small stretch of Interstate 90 that runs through the village. Its famous Lake Shore Boulevard has been featured in many magazines including Better Homes and Gardens.
Bratenahl is home to a once controversial luxury high-rise condominium complex. Though many residents opposed it at the time, in 1967 two large multi-occupancy buildings of brutalist architectural design we